Most of the shops I know of found a way to do "online shopping", even if that was in a very low-tech and old-fashioned way and only involved their own previous customers - an email blast, a note on the door, something like that, going down as far as phone-in orders, person-to-person PayPal payments, hand delivery to the doorstep, that sort of thing. None of them would be doing anything of the sort of business they usually did, since they'd only be covering customers who either don't know how to find things online or who are very loyal to the store and want to see it survive. (A little Mom & Pop is usually an expensive option, but having one in town, or in the next town over, is better than nothing. And folks like me who managed to transition from smoking as a result of popping into one of those weirdo electronic smoke stores one day on impulse with no real plan think having them around is a really good idea, even if most of what I buy is DIY supplies and clones from Chinese vendors.)

As for the landlords... well, it could be something as simple as not wanting to expose their financial shenanigans in a lot of cases. I've known a few, and there's definitely an element of "if you're not cheating, you're not doing it right" among that crowd. Thing is, they're not standing ankle-deep in blood or anything - it all tends to be nickel-and-dime stuff that's mostly cancelled out by the expense it took to break the rule. But it's the principle of the thing - why buy something for $20 when it feels much more "robber baron" to pay someone $19.95 to steal it for you (or, in a of of cases, buy it from a wholesaler you're not allowed to deal with and take their own little markup)? And, in my experience, they lose the 10-cent tax break they could have gotten from paying the twenty bucks in the first place and end up a nickel in the hole. But they're sticking it to the man in their own little way, and they're happy, so...