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#181 (permalink)      9/27/2020 1:25:09 PM US Central   quote/reply + tips
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gph61
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1) The fact that I'm posting about bread baking doesn't mean I'm living off bread anymore than my life revolves around Putin's puppet in the wh just because I post about it here.

2) The sugar in bread recipes is mostly fuel for the yeast to eat/ferment and produce co2/air holes in the crumb and flavour. You need to overwhelm the yeast with sugar in the initial recipe or incorporate it into the dough just before baking to get much of any of it through to the final loaf.

3) Almond flour is a possibility but I don't think it's suitable for this particular loaf. There's many gluten free flour possibilities to choose from but the overall recently emerging scheme appears to be mixtures of many flours within a 40% flours, 60% starches framework.

Edit, sweet rice flour is considered a starch in gluten free flour recipes.

Edited on 9/27/2020 at 2:22 PM. Reason:
If I'm ignoring you it's because you're fallacy impaired. Here's hoping you rectify your problem so that we might have a sensible conversation.
#182 (permalink)      9/29/2020 12:13:29 PM US Central   quote/reply + tips
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gph61
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This is just more scale tips. Keep dry ingredients separated by knocking them to one side after each ingredient is added:



Or pile them in separate locations:



That way you can easily pinch a bit out if you add too much.

For liquid ingredients, try to avoid pouring things right out of the container. Pour them into the cap or a spoon and then add using that. You'll be less likely to overdo it that way.
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#183 (permalink)      9/29/2020 1:52:06 PM US Central   quote/reply + tips
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gph61
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It worked :)







Buckwheat Gluten Free Bread

Dry Ingredients in a Sealable Container

Shake to combine:

28g Buckwheat Flour
28g Sorghum Flour
42g Potato Starch
42g Sweet Rice Flour (also called Glutinous Rice Flour)
4g Xanthan Gum
6g German bread spice
2.5g Salt
2.6g Instant Yeast

Wet Ingredients in a Mixing Bowl

Thoroughly liquefy honey before adding the rest, whip to a froth:

130g Water at roughly 100F
30g Unpasteurised Honey
2g Apple Cider Vinegar
12g Cooking Molasses
26g Vegetable Oil
1 Large Egg

Instructions

Thoroughly combine dry ingredients into mixing bowl using a spatula or power mixer.

Using a spatula or bowl scraper, manipulate the dough on to the side of the bowl, form it into your desired shape, cover it with sesame or poppy seeds then roll it down into the bowl and seed the underside. Roll in seeds until fully covered then roll the dough out into a loaf tin.

Cover the loaf tin and let dough rise to a little less than doubled in size, approximately 1.5 hours at average room temperature and humidity.

Bake at 375F for 1 hour.

Allow to cool to room temperature in the oven with the door closed.

That's a small loaf, it's going to need more baking time if it's scaled up to a normal sized loaf.

The seeds hide the texture difference between gluten free bread crusts and wheat bread crusts quite well. I shied away from using a touch of water to set the seeds like I normally would but I'm trying it next time. The overall taste and experience is closer to plain old whole wheat bread than the last loaf was. It tastes as good as it looks :)

To my senses this recipe is almost done but I want to mimic whole wheat so I'm going to reduce the volume of buckwheat flour a bit and replace it with more sorghum flour to hide some of that wonderful buckwheat bitter taste. I think playing with the flours and maybe adding other ones might get closer to a perfect whole wheat bread mimic.

I'll probably bump the German bread spice up too starting at 12 grams in the recipe above.

Increasing the German bread spice will decrease the overall hydration of the loaf but I'm thinking about doing that anyway to make smaller hole, spread friendly bread. I have no idea if going that far away from the drippy batter concept for gluten free bread will work. Speaking of a drippy batter, this is not that,



it's an average stiffness, sticky dough. It wants to gather itself and retains its shape the way wheat dough does.

On a side note, shaking the dry ingredients in a container beats my old method of using a whisk. I have 2 and 4 quart Rubbermaid containers that use these lids:





The lid reaches down into the container a lot. After shaking and rapping on it a couple times the lid can be removed without producing a cloud of flour.


Edited on 9/29/2020 at 2:18 PM. Reason:
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#184 (permalink)      10/3/2020 1:14:04 PM US Central   quote/reply + tips
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gph61
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I went full geek on this whole wheat mimic gluten free bread idea:



I used almost the same recipe that I posted above except I removed the combination of Buckwheat and Sorghum flours and replaced them with 6 different flours by themselves. I made the rest of the dry ingredients (sans the German bread spice) and all of the wet ingredients in bulk then divided them by 6 to make 6 unique flour doughs. They are Buckwheat, Sorghum, Brown rice, Garbanzo bean, Millet and Quinoa.

I found it to be a good way to quickly get comparison tastes of each flour but that's not the bit that's full geek. I used my kitchen scale to measure portions of each. My first mix and match in your mouth try has me leaning towards 40% Millet, 60% Sorghum but I'm going to revisit it again at least once.

Edited on 10/11/2020 at 9:28 AM. Reason:
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#185 (permalink)      10/4/2020 12:56:46 PM US Central   quote/reply + tips
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gph61
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sorry, wrong thread

Edited on 10/4/2020 at 1:27 PM. Reason:
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#186 (permalink)      10/10/2020 12:29:56 PM US Central   quote/reply + tips
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gph61
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This is just an update. I tried this recipe last night:

100% Whole Wheat Mimic Gluten Free Bread

Dry Ingredients in a Sealable Container
Shake to combine:

16g Millet Flour
12g Sorghum Flour
21g Potato Starch
21g Sweet Rice Flour (also called Glutinous Rice Flour)
2g Xanthan Gum
6g German bread spice
1.3g Salt
0.7g Instant Yeast

Wet Ingredients in a Mixing Bowl
Whip to thoroughly combine:

35g Unsweetened Applesauce at roughly 100F
16g Raw Honey, heat or stir until disolved
1.1g Apple Cider Vinegar
6g Cooking Molasses
13g Vegetable Oil
1/2 of an Extra Large Egg


Instructions

Thoroughly combine dry ingredients into mixing bowl using a spatula or power mixer.

Using a spatula or bowl scraper, manipulate the dough on to the side wall of the bowl, form it into your desired shape, brush with water, milk or egg and cover with raw husked sesame seeds, roll dough down into the bowl to brush and seed the underside. Roll in seeds to fully cover then pick up the dough and finish shaping by hand, place it in a loaf tin or on a baking tray.

Cover and let dough rise to 1.5 times its size

Bake at 375F for 50 minutes.

Allow to cool to room temperature in the oven with the door closed.

German Bread Spice

2½ parts caraway seed ground
2 parts fennel seed ground
1 part anise seed ground
½ part coriander seed ground





Things I've noticed:

- Covering the loaf in sesame seeds is better than poppy seeds because the poppy seeds burn more easily. Raw husked sesame seeds just toast a bit and retain some pliability in their texture.

- Though I'm still having difficulties nailing down an even, spread friendly small hole crumb, this recipe is the best yet. The previous one was the same as this except it had 40 grams of water instead of 35 grams of unsweetened applesauce. The result was a near perfect 100% whole wheat mimic with a more uneven crumb. The reduced hydration in this most recent attempt, by using less applesauce rather than water and the physical weight in the dough the applesauce imparts, helped to hold down the rise in the oven at the expense of making it an apple flavoured 100% whole wheat mimic. I still want to nail down a basic, even crumb, 100% whole wheat mimic so my next attempt will be back to using water with less hydration than this applesauce loaf.


Edit, these are the actual ingredients I'm using:









Edited on 10/11/2020 at 9:25 AM. Reason:
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#187 (permalink)      10/13/2020 8:14:05 AM US Central   quote/reply + tips
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gph61
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I'm close to satisfied with this.

First formed:


Just before the oven:






100% Whole Wheat Mimic Gluten Free Bread


Dry Ingredients in a Sealable Container

Shake to combine:

32g Millet Flour
24g Sorghum Flour
42g Potato Starch
42g Sweet Rice Flour (also called Glutinous Rice Flour)
4g Xanthan Gum
12g German bread spice
2.6g Salt
2.2g Instant Yeast


Wet Ingredients in a Mixing Bowl

Whip to a froth:

50g Water at roughly 100F
32g Raw Honey, heat or stir until dissolved
2.2g Apple Cider Vinegar
12g Cooking Molasses
26g Vegetable Oil
1 Extra Large Egg


Instructions

Thoroughly combine dry ingredients into mixing bowl using a spatula or dough scraper.

Shape, cover and allow to rise for roughly 2 hours or to twice its size.

Thoroughly knock back and form into desired shape. Close seams using normal wheat dough methods.

Apply water, milk or egg and cover with raw husked sesame seeds.

Cover and let rise for roughly 2 hours or 1¾ times its size. Use the distance between the seeds as a gauge.

Bake at 375F for 50 minutes.

Allow to cool to room temperature in the oven with the door closed.

I want to see if there's improvement to be had in playing with the baking temperature and time, maybe even open the door and take it out once it's done. As far as flavour goes, I like it other than I want to see if there's a too much German bread spice wall.

There's no steam balloon in the oven effect that caused the wetter mixes to collapse. The bottom goes slightly concave, I think because of staying in the oven to slowly cool, but the rest holds its shape fine. Speaking of the bottom, I always use a tray on the lower oven shelf to create a radiant heat shield for the bottom of whatever the dough is sitting on.

Some notes:

- It's not as sticky as wheat dough. It's easy to form in your hands at this small size at least.

- I split the recipe to knock one sample back. It's the one on the left in the pics above. The yeast was a little less aggressive on the 2nd rise. It does taste a bit better, about as improved as wheat dough is using the same processes.

- At this stiffness it's a little harder to mix it smooth by hand. I had no trouble doing it the same way I mix and knead wheat dough but I don't do that like others do. So, here's how I do it if your way doesn't work. I combine dry and wet with a long thin thing, my favourite is long handled jar spatulas. Then I sit down holding the bowl in front of me with one hand like a steering wheel. I use the other hand and a dough scraper to smear the dough down towards my lap. With wheat dough I then use the flat face of the scraper to stretch it up and away but this dough isn't as adhesive. Turn the wheel a bit and repeat. Plastic and metal bowls are better than glass because they're lighter. I find I can do it faster than countertop kneading with the added bonus of not being up to my elbows in dough.

- another thing I always do is warm the flour and eggs or whatever in the oven with the light on before I start.


Edited on 10/13/2020 at 8:19 AM. Reason:
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#188 (permalink)      10/20/2020 12:22:17 PM US Central   quote/reply + tips
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gph61
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This is the best so far

100% Whole Wheat Mimic Gluten Free Bread

Dry Ingredients in a Sealable Container
Shake to combine:

32g Millet Flour
24g Sorghum Flour
42g Potato Starch
42g Sweet Rice Flour (also called Glutinous Rice Flour)
4g Xanthan Gum
16g German bread spice
2.6g Salt
2.2g Instant Yeast

Wet Ingredients in a Mixing Bowl
Whip to a froth:

54g Water at roughly 100F
32g Raw Honey, heat or stir until dissolved
2.2g Apple Cider Vinegar
12g Cooking Molasses
30g Vegetable Oil
1 Extra Large Egg

Instructions
Thoroughly combine dry ingredients into mixing bowl using a spatula or dough scraper.

Shape to a roughly smooth ball, cover and allow to rise for about 2 hours or to twice its size.

Thoroughly knock back and form into desired shape. Close seams using normal wheat dough methods.

Apply water, milk or egg and cover with raw husked sesame seeds.

Cover and let rise for roughly 2 hours or 1¾ times its size. Use the distance between the seeds as a gauge.

Score if desired and bake at 450F for 25 minutes on an open tray.

Place loaf on a cooling rack to completely cool before slicing.

I tweaked the recipe a little and baked it on an open tray at 450F for 25 minutes. I used an egg wash which slightly burnt the crust. If you don't like that use water to stick the seeds. The only thing I might change now is maybe more bread spice.

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#189 (permalink)      11/13/2020 7:47:05 AM US Central   quote/reply + tips
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I don't want to start a thread and I didn't see any thread that I thought would be good so I found your bread thread gph I hope you don't mind. Just an article. We need a news thread.

How the pandemic readied Alibaba’s AI for the world’s biggest shopping day

The news: While the US has been hooked on its election, China has been shopping. From November 1 to 11, the country's top e-commerce giants, Alibaba and JD, generated $115 billion in sales as part of their annual Single’s Day shopping bonanza. Alibaba, who started the festival in 2009, accounted for $74.1 billion of those sales, a 26% increase on last year. For comparison, Amazon’s 48-hour Prime Day sales only crossed the $10-billion mark this year.

Broken models: In the initial weeks after the coronavirus outbreak, both companies saw their AI models behaving oddly. Because the pandemic struck during the Chinese New Year, hundreds of millions of people who would have otherwise been holiday shopping were instead buying lockdown necessities. The erratic behavior made it impossible to rely on historical data. “All of our forecasts were no longer accurate,” says Andrew Huang, general manager of the domestic supply chain at Cainiao, Alibaba’s logistics division.

People were also buying things for different reasons, which was flying in the face of the platforms’ product recommendations. For example, JD's algorithm assumed people who bought masks were sick and so recommended medicine, when it might have made more sense to recommend them hand sanitizer.



Read more at: https://www.technologyreview.com/2020/11/13/1012073/pandemic-prepared-ai-for-alibaba-singles-day/

Ko