shopping cart empty
WORLDWIDE FREE SHIPPING

Straightening Stabilized Wood?
Login to post a new topic and to write a reply.
Thread Tools Rate This Thread


Search within thread:

Login to rate this thread.
#1 (permalink)      2/18/2018 7:04:16 AM US Central   quote/reply + tips
Avatar
Morris68
Member
  • JoinedNov 2014
  • Posts 5369
  • Reviews 50
  • Kudos8328
Straightening Stabilized Wood?
Got an earlier model of this, one with oval holes front & back, a while back. The price was good ($32) and the box works quite well. Hits hard and no arcing or problems in general...EXCEPT, the front panel has ovbiously buckled enough that if the bottom magnet is holding in place, the top sticks out about a millimeter.

It's never fallen off so it's quite usable but that slight overhang does bother me. Is there anything I can do (without a huge amount of effort and/or skill) to fix it? Or not?
“O wad some Power the giftie gie us, to see oursels as ithers see us!" Robert Burns
#2 (permalink)      2/18/2018 7:19:29 AM US Central   quote/reply + tips
Avatar
leftjeffa
Member
  • JoinedAug 2013
  • Posts 6322
  • Reviews 39
  • Kudos9254
+1 details
I'll have a guess: Try remove magnets, with a pin perhaps, before starting. Then lean in with orbital sander (about 60 grit) on the inside of the protruding area, and work up grits. That might even it out.

After doors in place, it probably won't be flush with case, so lightly sand over the face with 2** grit, until even.

Coat with epoxy. Profit.

That's all loose guesswork ;)

Edited on 2/18/2018 at 7:20 AM. Reason: -the
Resistance is not futile, it's V/I
#3 (permalink)      2/18/2018 8:07:44 AM US Central   quote/reply + tips
Avatar
Morris68
Member
  • JoinedNov 2014
  • Posts 5369
  • Reviews 50
  • Kudos8328
+1 details
@leftjeffa Probably a good idea but the magnets are tiny and I'm afraid if I got them out I wouldn't be able to get them back in. Also, the rest of the project seems a bit daunting given my limited skills set.

What about placing the door between to flat sheets of something strong (plexiglass or whatever), tightening them with vice clamps and leaving it that way for a while and, if so, for how long?

Edited on 2/18/2018 at 8:08 AM. Reason:
“O wad some Power the giftie gie us, to see oursels as ithers see us!" Robert Burns
#4 (permalink)      2/18/2018 9:28:33 AM US Central   quote/reply + tips
Avatar
vape8ion
Member
  • JoinedOct 2013
  • Posts 13057
  • Reviews 45
  • Kudos20656
+4 details
Morris68 wrote:

@leftjeffa Probably a good idea but the magnets are tiny and I'm afraid if I got them out I wouldn't be able to get them back in. Also, the rest of the project seems a bit daunting given my limited skills set.What about placing the door between to flat sheets of something strong (plexiglass or whatever), tightening them with vice clamps and leaving it that way for a while and, if so, for how long?



The press idea might work, like a 10% chance. Stabilized wood is difficult. Before you press it, steam it for a while then leave it pressed for a couple of days to let the moisture evaporate. Try to get a vise or use several clamps Planing it down with the sander is really your best option. Barring that, you just have to live with the warped door.

I'm out.....have some fun. Eh?
#5 (permalink)      2/18/2018 9:49:18 AM US Central   quote/reply + tips
Avatar
cilika
Member
  • JoinedSep 2013
  • Posts 15146
  • Reviews 380
  • Kudos29160
+3 details
I'd go rather to the steam/ press way.
Even trying to put it in the freezer after steaming (if your press is small enough) ;)
But the thing, that wood will always continue to work.
One suggestion was from a carpenter friend, that you varnish... the inside part. (Sure, stick something on the magnets while doing that) That might pull the panel in the opposite direction.

Edited on 2/18/2018 at 9:51 AM. Reason:
#6 (permalink)      2/18/2018 9:53:50 AM US Central   quote/reply + tips
Avatar
cilika
Member
  • JoinedSep 2013
  • Posts 15146
  • Reviews 380
  • Kudos29160
Well, I thought that the press might work, as I adventured with the same box...the bombed shaped two holes version what I received.
And I think it's not even wood, just some composite material trying to imitate it (on mine, pretty badly...)
#7 (permalink)      2/18/2018 10:24:25 AM US Central   quote/reply + tips
wuwei.ap
Member
  • JoinedMar 2015
  • Posts 22101
  • Reviews 266
  • Kudos42159
+3 details
Try a hot iron and a wet cloth on the bowed side so it expands, but it's wood, it will move a bit depending on the weather. Although, stabilised wood is supposed to be like solid resin. If you sand it it might need a wood sealer like shellac or varnish.

Usually, you use a hot iron and wet cloth to raise the fibers or dents in wood.

Edit: clothes iron that is...

Edited on 2/18/2018 at 10:26 AM. Reason:
#8 (permalink)      2/18/2018 11:13:56 AM US Central   quote/reply + tips
Avatar
leftjeffa
Member
  • JoinedAug 2013
  • Posts 6322
  • Reviews 39
  • Kudos9254
+1 details
Has it been like this since it arrived, or was it overtime? Wondering if it's settled since place of origin. It could just be what's known as a twist, where the makers never levelled and planed the cut properly, hence the DIY to repair.

If it's warped from moisture, then vice is a fair idea but you don't want it to snap, so try try throw it in the over at about 90°C (google says just over 190°F) for 24hrs to completely remove any moisture to get it back to how it arrived. Some people who work with stab wood, throw it in an oven to dry for a couple days but don't know how your gas bills fare. Other than try some of the aforementioned. See how you go.

The reason I say epoxy - have you seen stabilised wood with a clear coated epoxy? It looks supoib. Really brings out the dull look you see here
Resistance is not futile, it's V/I
#9 (permalink)      2/18/2018 11:17:32 AM US Central   quote/reply + tips
Avatar
cilika
Member
  • JoinedSep 2013
  • Posts 15146
  • Reviews 380
  • Kudos29160
+3 details
I don't want to deviate the thread but will post a pic of mine. Just to make your day.



Ps.: Managed to change the colours since. Ehm... A propos, can you normally stain stab wood?

Edited on 2/18/2018 at 11:18 AM. Reason:
#10 (permalink)      2/18/2018 11:37:16 AM US Central   quote/reply + tips
Avatar
leftjeffa
Member
  • JoinedAug 2013
  • Posts 6322
  • Reviews 39
  • Kudos9254
+3 details
Really couldn't find any photos of this mods' colour (red/mustard), but with usually a self-levelling coat of epoxy just lightly brushed over on each side would really bring it out:

Like I said ^ couldn't find many examples. Don't go there :)

...And looking at some of the defects and gaps, sorry but it's so overlooked. Reason why I don't jump at stab wood from our mates just yet, though it can be fixed. There's something called (can't quite remember)...in-burn, burn-it resin...anyway, you basically melt resin in there of similar colour before you'd coat it. Coating will weather-proof it a little more. Probably TMI.

ETA: Burn-In sticks Definitely TMI

Edited on 2/18/2018 at 11:46 AM. Reason:
Resistance is not futile, it's V/I
#11 (permalink)      2/18/2018 11:46:38 AM US Central   quote/reply + tips
wuwei.ap
Member
  • JoinedMar 2015
  • Posts 22101
  • Reviews 266
  • Kudos42159
+3 details
The other thing was how the mod is stored. If it was in sunlight, it might also account for the warp. But wood, it does it's own thing.