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This cant be 30W
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#101 (permalink)      4/2/2015 8:13:27 PM US Central   quote/reply + tips
mikedoucett
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I just got dumber reading most of this (not you JPBel). A Watt is heat lol. A Watt is a unit of energy not just heat. According to the 1st law of thermodynamics in this case where apparently 99% of electrical energy is converted to heat on the coil is a terrible assumption because there are losses converting the electricity to heat i.e wires heating up (and yes because of resistance), battery getting warm etc. My bet is a better assumption would be 80-90% conversion.

In order to get the actual Watts of heat on the coil, you have to subtract all the losses in the system (adjusting actual power conversion with an efficiency in the above range). You would have to subtract the latent heat of evaporation, the energy of the air coiling the coil, the heat being transferred to the liquid in the tank, and the heat transfer by the atomizer to the surrounding air/hand etc.

I am just saying that whatever reading your screen says in terms of power is not the same as the heat power being given off by the coil. End rant.
#102 (permalink)      4/2/2015 8:38:26 PM US Central   quote/reply + tips
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Aschzzz
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nothing to see here
#103 (permalink)      4/2/2015 10:50:01 PM US Central   quote/reply + tips
JPBel
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@mikedoucett
The conversion will be 100%, but that 100% is not from the coil alone.

JeremiahBarrar opened my eyes when he stopped using insults, joules are joules.
It made me doubt my own logic and i started to take what he wrote more seriously.
I am right in that lowering your coil's resistance will make it produce less heat tho.
Resistance do play a role in all this, two resistance of equal value will dissipate the watts equally.
If you pass 10 watts in a 2 resistances circuit they can not sink 10 watts each.
If it is not the coil or the wires that heat up it will be the power supply.
What have the highest resistance will heat the most.

Edited on 4/2/2015 at 11:32 PM. Reason: