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AWG 33 34 35 ?
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#1 (permalink)      2/22/2014 6:04:11 AM US Central   quote/reply + tips
eljano
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AWG 33 34 35 ?
I do not know what AWG 33 34 35 ...
What is it exactly ?
is there someone who can answer me?
Thanks.

Je ne comprends ce que signifie AWG 33 AWG 34 AWG 35 ?
Quelqu'un pour me répondre ?
Merci.
#2 (permalink)      2/22/2014 6:18:42 AM US Central   quote/reply + tips
kaostechno
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Thickness of the wire.
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#3 (permalink)      2/22/2014 6:21:53 AM US Central   quote/reply + tips
TxCharlie
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Edited on 2/22/2014 at 6:30 AM. Reason:
#4 (permalink)      2/22/2014 6:29:48 AM US Central   quote/reply + tips
TxCharlie
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It's the thickness of the wire. AWG stands for American Wire Gage Most house wiring is 12AWG. Thin magnet wire is down in the 30 AWG level (larger AWG= smaller wire).

In your application, I assume that the thicker 33 AWG's may run hotter and draw more current than a 35 AWG of the same length, because the thinner wire has more resistance, thus less current.

However, they can make a 33 AWG heating wire longer to balance out the difference in current caused by its thickness. In that case, 33 and 30 AWG would draw the same current. The difference would then be that the 30 AWG is mechanically more durable.

Edited on 2/22/2014 at 6:33 AM. Reason:
#5 (permalink)      2/22/2014 6:32:55 AM US Central   quote/reply + tips
bibi2013
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perhaps someone can confirm, that

- THINNER WIRE (higher AWG) --- HIGHER resistance --- gets SLOWER hot

(than thicker wire, lower AWG)
or

- THICKER wire (lower AWG) --- LOWER resistance --- FASTER hot...

Edited on 2/22/2014 at 6:33 AM. Reason:
Edited on 13/32/2013 at 13:61 PM. Reason: yes
#6 (permalink)      2/22/2014 6:46:30 AM US Central   quote/reply + tips
TxCharlie
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Thinner wire has less thermal mass, so generally gets hot quicker than a thicker wire of the same resistance with the same power applied.

Two extreme examples:
Q: Which gets hot faster, a light bulb or an electric stove?
A: Light bulb gets much hotter much quicker.
The stove never gets as hot as the filament of a bulb -- but thst'd in s very small area. The stove coil is much bigger, much longer, and has 100x the current flowing through it - So it generates more heat.in terms of Watts and BTU, the stove greatly outperforms the amount of total heat.
#7 (permalink)      2/22/2014 6:49:09 AM US Central   quote/reply + tips
bibi2013
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ok, makes more sense...

perhaps someone can confirm, that

- THINNER WIRE (higher AWG) --- HIGHER resistance --- gets FASTER hot

(than thicker wire, lower AWG)
or

- THICKER wire (lower AWG) --- LOWER resistance --- SLOWER hot...
Edited on 13/32/2013 at 13:61 PM. Reason: yes
#8 (permalink)      2/24/2014 3:51:44 AM US Central   quote/reply + tips
eljano
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OK, thanks to all !
I also found that :
http://www.technick.net/public/code/cp_dpage.php?aiocp_dp=guide_awg_to_metric

AWG-Inch-----mm--mm²
32 0.00795 0.202 0.0320
33 0.00708 0.180 0.0254
34 0.00631 0.160 0.0201
35 0.00562 0.143 0.0160
36 0.00500 0.127 0.0127