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Get these without the breadboard pins soldered in?
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#1 (permalink)      7/30/2013 3:42:28 PM US Central   quote/reply + tips
judas
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Get these without the breadboard pins soldered in?
Folks,

If your supplier offers it, it would be great if you could get these without the breadboard pins along the sides soldered in already. They are a pain to unsolder and those of us using these in a lot of projects end up having to do that a lot.

I buy about thirty nanos a year but am working with a supplier off an auction site who provides them with the pins just in the bag and I can solder them in myself, which is easy, where taking them off is kind of a minor pain.

I would rather buy them through you if you can get them since I am making regular orders anyway.
#2 (permalink)      8/1/2013 1:16:42 AM US Central   quote/reply + tips
ddgls08
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What do you make with this? I am thinking about getting more into more professional kits rather than my frankenstine projects now pieced together from parts here and there but wondering what all this can do?
#3 (permalink)      8/1/2013 12:41:53 PM US Central   quote/reply + tips
judas
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Well, the most interesting was a 20' tall fire shooting robot. Technically it wasn't a robot, and more of a sculpture, but I wanna say 20' tall fire shooting robot cause it sounds cooler. I have used them in switch timing circuits for mapping cameras (like the google map cars, only on a tricycle, which did not, unfortunately, shoot fire), brain stimulation devices, semi-intelligent lighting switches, and various data collectors (almost all basically toy kinda experiment stuff on that side).

There are much more powerful embedded processors out there in the price range (the Discovery boards come to mind), but these are quick and easy and are small. So anything that doesn't need more than 10 bit ADC or 20Mhz is fair game. That ends up being a lot of crap. One of the places I use them a lot is basically as smart switch controllers on various things. You need ot have something fire three times when you push the button, or have a delay, or come on when someone enters the room. Most of that you can do with discrete components easily enough, but I end up using these cause they are cheap and I have them lying around and don't have to think much.
#4 (permalink)      11/12/2013 3:19:41 AM US Central   quote/reply + tips
longjohn119
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Snip them off flush first so the pins don't act as a heatsink and you'll find the remaining stubs come out a lot easier
#5 (permalink)      3/11/2014 12:59:24 PM US Central   quote/reply + tips
PotentM1
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I notice the pictures do not show a coaxial power socket on these. Do you have to power these through the USB connector? I'm a relative newbie to arduino.
#6 (permalink)      2/16/2015 9:15:33 PM US Central   quote/reply + tips
Strik3
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you can power these via usb or by applying 5v to vin and gnd
#7 (permalink)      8/20/2015 8:11:42 AM US Central   quote/reply + tips
Hermith
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Can this be used as a HID device (e.g. a keyboard)?